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Friday, 26 August 2011
Feds Raid Gibson Guitar...Why?
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The Tennessean is carrying the story this morning, but here is the Gibson Guitar press release:

The Federal Department of Justice in Washington, D.C. has suggested that the use of wood from India that is not finished by Indian workers is illegal, not because of U.S. law, but because it is the Justice Department’s interpretation of a law in India. (If the same wood from the same tree was finished by Indian workers, the material would be legal.) This action was taken without the support and consent of the government in India.

On August 24, 2011, around 8:45 a.m. CDT, agents for the federal government executed four search warrants on Gibson’s facilities in Nashville and Memphis and seized several pallets of wood, electronic files and guitars. Gibson had to cease its manufacturing operations and send workers home for the day, while armed agents executed the search warrants. Gibson has fully cooperated with the execution of the search warrants.

• Raid shut down Gibson factories and cost company money
This is the second time that federal agents have raided Gibson facilities and disrupted production – this time causing lost productivity and sales.

• Wood seized was Forest Stewardship Council Controlled
The wood the Government seized on August 24 is from a Forest Stewardship Council certified supplier and is FSC Controlled, meaning that the wood complies with the standards of the Forest Stewardship Council, which is an industry-recognized and independent, not-for-profit organization established to promote responsible management of the world’s forests. FSC Controlled Wood standards require, among other things, that the wood not be illegally harvested and not be harvested in violation of traditional and civil rights. See www.fsc.org for more information. Gibson has a long history of supporting sustainable and responsible sources of wood and has worked diligently with entities such as the Rainforest Alliance and Greenpeace to secure FSC certified supplies. The wood seized on August 24 satisfied FSC standards.

• Nearly two years later, no charges have been filed
In 2009, more than a dozen agents with automatic weapons invaded the Gibson factory in Nashville. The Government seized guitars and a substantial amount of ebony fingerboard blanks from Madagascar. To date, 1 year and 9 months later, criminal charges have NOT been filed, yet the Government still holds Gibson’s property. Gibson has obtained sworn statements and documents from the Madagascar government and these materials, which have been filed in federal court, show that the wood seized in 2009 was legally exported under Madagascar law and that no law has been violated. Gibson is attempting to have its property returned in a civil proceeding that is pending in federal court.

The Justice Department has asked the judge to stop the court case indefinitely.

• Information sought in raid was already made available
Since 2009, Gibson has fully cooperated with the Government’s investigation of wood and has provided substantial documentation regarding Gibson’s wood-buying activities over the years. Yet, the Federal Government raided Gibson’s facilities on August 24, 2011, without warning or communication of any kind. Had the Government simply communicated with Gibson, Gibson would have cooperated without having to stop its production and send workers home.

• Not about illegal logging, not about conservation, not about the environment
The U.S. Lacey Act does not directly address conservation issues but is about obeying all laws of the countries from which wood products are procured. This law reads that you are guilty if you did not observe a law even though you had no knowledge of that law in a foreign country. The U.S. Lacey Act is only applicable when a foreign law has been violated.

CEO Henry Juszkiewicz  told The Tennessean:

“Over the last two years, we have hired 580 American workers,” he said. “We are one company that is manufacturing in the United States, that is hiring people ... and yet the government is spending millions of dollars on this issue.

“We feel totally abused.”

The Wall Street Journal has more on environmental enforcement run amok.

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Posted on 08/26/2011 5:48 AM by Rebecca Bynum
Comments
26 Aug 2011
Send an emailLugo

Who cares what the law is in India? The job of the US government is to enforce US law, not Indian law. Sheesh!



26 Aug 2011
Send an emailreactionry
A Vaste Programme of Programmers
Or: Shine On, Harvest Whirlwind
Or: Plucky Little Plucking Gibson Girls Plucked From The Plight Of Poverty
 
 
Lugo shows an appalling contempt for the executive branch's prosecutorial discretion prerogative and that hypocrite would likely not agree that importation of say, unfinished monkey wood goods***, is a far worse crime than, say again, the monkey shines and fraud committed in the importation of computer programmers from India via the H1B program and he is also likely opposed to Obama's decision not to deport those illegal aliens guilty only of invading** the United States. Such an invasion is, of course, genocidal when carried out on a massive scale, and genocide of Ice People is not to be prosecuted, but, rather, celebrated. Any failure to so celebrate is racist and I'll wager that Lugo is so racist that he believes that Obama* wasn't born in the US and should be deported.
 
** Well, that and relatively "nonviolent" felonies, and yes, invasion (more by Mexicans & their OTM cousins than by Indians) of the US is non-violent because the evil Ice People have wisely decided not to violently resist it, unlike the Amerinds, who, in contrast, were, like, totally justified in torturing and killing said Ice People.
[The guitar company should make amends by paying reparations to India and by replacing its current workforce with Indian Gibson Kelly Girls (and boys, and no, don't call them "girls" or "boys" even if they're underage - at the risk of litigation, and yes, they would be here only temporarily, and yes, there should be proportionate representation by Muslim Machine Gun Kelly Girls.]
*** Also see the precedent-setting Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or Baksheesh? Sheesh!
 
Tags: Refugee Quangos, Onyangos, Deportation a no-go in a felonious foreigner farrago




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