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UK or USA, its all about their rights, never their responsibilities

From the Los Angeles Times

A Muslim woman from San Diego is suing Southwest Airlines after being taken off a flight in March when crew members deemed her behavior suspicious.

Irum Abbasi, who was wearing a hijab, the Islamic head scarf, was seated on a flight preparing to depart from San Diego's Lindbergh Field for San Jose when a flight attendant became concerned about something she thought Abbasi had said on her cellphone. Abbasi later said that she told someone on her cellphone, "I have to go," but that the attendant thought she had said, "It's a go."

Abbasi was escorted off the plane by an employee of the Transportation Security Administration.

The lawsuit, filed on her behalf by the Council on American-Islamic Relations-California and noted San Diego civil liberties attorney James McElroy, charges the airline with discrimination.

Three days after the March 13 incident, the airline apologized and noted that Abbasi was seated on the next flight to San Jose and given a travel voucher. "We sincerely apologize for the customer's inconvenience," the airline said in its public apology.

And from The Telegraph

An Oxford University student claims he was mistaken for a suicide bomber by police as he jogged around the city's streets.

The suspect was ordered to stop running, put his hands in the air and drop everything in his hands as sub-machine guns were trained on his body.

The officers carefully took off the heavily padded vest and searched it, looking for explosives and a detonator. However, they found the Oxford University PhD student was wearing a training vest loaded with weights for added resistance when running.

Iranian student Goudarz Karimi said he was shocked by the police response even after they realised he was not a suicide bomber. . . He said that when they realised it was an exercise vest they advised him to remove it to prevent any another call from a terrified member of the public.

"They told me I'd have to take my vest off - I didn't want to provoke anything else and that's why I put my jacket over it.

He said he feared his ethnic origin had sparked the concerns. "I am 100 per cent sure that if I was blond with Caucasian skin type, nobody would have noticed and said anything about it. But I'm of dark skin complexion and from Iran and I'm sure that's related to it," he said.

"I felt a bit like my rights were violated. The police told me to take my vest off and to go home and I don't see why I should. The point is the first time they stopped me, they asked me not to walk there anymore. They said 'maybe it's better somewhere else, like in a park'.

"Then later, when I wanted to do another round of the block and I was walking near the police car, the police officer said 'You've got to stop.' I said 'I've not finished my work-out' and he explicitly said: 'Take off your vest'."

Superintendent Amanda Pearson, of Thames Valley Police, said ". . .the officers were responding to a call from a member of the public who had a genuine concern and police are duty bound to investigate any calls of this nature to ensure public safety. In order to stop any further calls from members of the public, the gentleman was asked to put his coat on, which he agreed to do. . . The officers have to weigh up a number of factors to determine if a stop and search is proportionate, and justified, and the decision to stop and search would not be made on ethnicity alone and wasn't in this case."



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